Category Archives: Extreme Macro Techniques

Taking Advantage Of High Magnification Objective For Lower Magnification Work

Whenever you see a specification for a microscope objective, you will likely see the term NA, the numerical aperture value. Many people, particularly beginners in extreme macro photography, ignore or pay less attention to this parameter of an objective, and mainly focus on magnification and (eventually) working distance, but in actuality, the value of NA plays very important role.

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Cleaning Up In Post After Stacking

Why is your insect subject so clean? This question comes up very often when I post a stacked image on Facebook or Flickr. The reason for this question is probably due to the fact that most insect subjects are “dirty” – pollen, dusts, or other little things that are part of insects’ life, so it is hard to get “clean” look when they are photographed.

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So how do I get them to have a clean look? more…

How To Determine Magnification Level

When doing extreme macro photography, one of the most frequently asked question is: What Is My Magnification Level? This question arises when there is no marking on a lens or in many situations that it is just very difficult to determine magnification. For example, a DIY’ed setup, a reversed zoom lens, a lens from garage sale, etc. I have been asked with this questions so many times that I think it is time to write this blog. more…

Selecting Microscope Objectives For Beginners

Isn’t it cool to use a microscope objective for macro photography? I mean, just by looking at it, it is cool. But when I first started using microscope objectives on my Canon 550D, I made quite a few mistakes. That was largely due to the fact that I did not understand what microscope objectives are and how they should be used to achieve the result I wanted.

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It is very cool to have an objective mounted in front of a telephoto lens, just by looking at it. This objective is an achromatic 4x infinite one with NA of 0.1. It is mounted on a 70-300 mm telephoto lens

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